Google Adwords

How to Write a Killer Google Adwords Ad?

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Google AdwordsThe influence of Google and Google Adwords can be understood from the fact that a recent survey asked the question “where is the center of the internet?”, and perhaps unsurprisingly the answer was Google.

Since its inception in 1998, Google has become a mainstay of modern life. In fact, it’s probably the most commonly chosen home page on the web, with countless people using it as a starting point whenever they browse the web.

But Google’s not just about searches – far from it. Its diversification has been a talking point for years, and it now offers everything from calendars to online office applications. One of its most popular ventures is the Google Adwords program, and there are now thousands of companies who rely on Google Adwords as their sole source of new business.

What is Google Adwords – Clicks, bids and conversions?

So what is Google Adwords and how does Google Adwords benefit businesses? Well, instead of patronising you with a by-the-numbers description of what Google Adwords is, let’s just say it’s a service whereby companies pay Google to show their ads at the top of the search results.

There’s a whole host of metrics that can be analyzed, and making an effective Google Adwords campaign has become somewhat of an art form; however it all boils down to one thing: a well-written ad. It’s the wording of the ad that causes people to click, provides them with a strong call to action and (with any luck) converts them into new customers. It’s all about getting them on the hook then dazzling them with your business.

So how do you go about writing an effective Google Adwords ad? Well, first off you need to consider your limitations. Your ad can only have a maximum of 70 characters including spaces for the body and 25 including spaces for the title. This doesn’t give you much wiggle room – so you need to be as succinct as possible.

Fishing for new business – Effective Google Adwords ads

We already know that you’re aiming to get new customers on the hook, so you should have a good idea of how to go about this (assuming you already do some self-promotion).

If you really have no idea about the selling points of your business, or whether you have a USP (Unique Selling Point), you might benefit from a brainstorming session to answer those questions.

Assuming you already have your list of features and benefits, let’s think about distilling those into less than 100 characters.

Your first job? Throw out the features and focus on benefits. That’s right, kick them to the curb.

A search engine user is looking for answers, so you give them to them. Decide what your company’s absolute best benefit is, then focus on that. If you sell the best running shoes in town, tell everyone in your title. If you’re the only stockist of the latest in fishing lines, shout about it! It’s all about giving users an offer they can’t refuse. Once they’re on the website you can fill them in on the details, so polish your key benefits and truly make them shine.

Breaking the law, breaking the law – The Google Adwords Guidelines

Don’t forget that, just like all elements of life, there are rules and regulations for you to follow at Google Adwords. And most of them are common sense: don’t use profanity, don’t insult people, and so on.

If you’ve managed to keep your business afloat so far, you probably know how your customers like to be spoken to. So take this tone of voice and expand it to the national (or even global) scale of Google Adwords. As a general rule of thumb, if it works in ‘real life’, it’ll probably work online too.

After a little practice with writing Google Adwords ads, you’ll soon find that it’s a balancing act. Perhaps write a few options, set them all to go live, then wait and watch the fireworks. You’ll quickly find out what works and what doesn’t. And through this process of trial and error, you’ll quickly find your diamond in the rough and you will see that you have some killer Google Adwords ads running on the web.

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